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Common Core - “The What” . Desoto County Schools K-2 Symposium Day One June 6, 2011 Rosie King . The Party BEFORE the Party .

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Common core the what

Common Core - “The What”

Desoto County Schools

K-2 Symposium Day One June 6, 2011 Rosie King


The party before the party
The Party BEFORE the Party

Using the materials on your table, work together with your school to create a visual representation of a student entering your school. You may use text or illustrations to express as much about the student as possible. Make it FUN! 

We are expecting K-2 teachers to BLOW us away with their creativity! 


Common core the what1

Common Core - “The What”

Desoto County Schools

K-2 Symposium Day One June 6, 2011


Why am i here
Why am I here!?

  • To become confident in your understanding of the Common Core State Standards

  • To become equipped to train your school/colleagues in understanding the Common Core State Standards

  • To become the Common Core Leadership team for your school

    • Common Core Leaders will replace Literacy and Math Leaders in K-2 schools this year.


What am i supposed to do
What am I Supposed to do?

  • Learn EVERYTHING you possibly can!

  • Ask questions and make meaning out of everything!

  • Stay engaged and monitor your own comprehension!!

  • Work as a Common Core Leadership Team to develop your school’s implementation plan.

    • Present parts of the two-day training to your colleagues.


Today s schedule
Today’s Schedule

  • 8:30 Common Core

  • Common Core

  • Common Core

  • 11:45ish Lunch

  • Common Core

  • Common Core

  • Common Core

  • 3:30 Dismissal


Monitoring your comprehension please ask questions
Monitoring YOUR Comprehension…Please, ask questions!

If you think of any questions or concerns during the next two days, please write your questions on a post-it note and put it in the parking lot. During breaks and transitions, we address any questions that can be answered. We will use the questions to update the FAQ document.


Processing and synthesizing the information turn and talk
Processing and Synthesizing the Information “Turn and Talk”

Everyone find a partner at your table. Determine who is partner 1 and who is partner 2.

You will be prompted to “turn and talk” to your partners at a various points through-out the presentation.


Taking notes two column note
Taking Notes Two-Column Note

Each school will receive a copy of today’s PowerPoint at the END OF THE DAY.  You are encouraged to utilize the “Two-Column Notes”provided for you on your table.


Introduction
INTRODUCTION

Common Core State Standards


Why new standards
WHY “new” standards?

  • The CCSS ELA standards “the standards” are the culmination of an extended and broad-based effort to fulfill the charge issued by the states to create the next generation of K-12 standards in order to help ensure that ALL students are college and career ready in literacy not later than the end of high school.


Who led the development of the standards
Who Led the Development of the Standards?

  • CCSSO-Council of Chief State School Officers

  • NGA- National Governors Association


What makes the development of the ccss standards different than our current standards
What makes the development of the CCSS standards different than our current standards?

  • They were developed among the states and not as a separate entity.

  • They draw on the most important INTERNATIONAL models, as well as research and input from numerous sources, including state departments, scholars, assessment developers, professional organizations, educators from college to kindergarten, parents,students and members of the public.


The standards are
The Standards are than our current standards?

  • Research and evidence based

  • Aligned with college and work expectations

  • Rigorous

  • Internally benchmarked


A standard was included in the document ONLY when the best available evidence indicated that mastery was essential for college and career readiness in a 21st century, globally competitive society.


The Standards are intended to be a available evidence indicated that mastery was essential for college and career readiness in a 21living work; as new and better evidence emerges, the Standards will be revised accordingly.


Students who meet the Standards develop the skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for creative and purposeful expression in language.


Ccr and ccss
CCR and CCSS reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for creative and purposeful expression in language.

  • The Standards are an extension of a prior initiative lead by CCSSO and NGA to develop College and Career Readiness standards in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language as well as in mathematics.

  • The CCR Standards are the backbone for the present document.


Ccr and ccss1
CCR and CCSS reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for creative and purposeful expression in language.

  • Grade-specific K-12 standards in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language translate the broad (and, for the earliest grades, seemingly distant) aims of the CCR standards into age and attainment appropriate terms.


In other words
In other words… reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for creative and purposeful expression in language.

  • The CCR standards are broad and define distant expectations

  • The CCSS standards provide specificity about what working toward CCR looks like in Kindergarten, 1st, and 2nd grade.


Working with it
Working with It reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for creative and purposeful expression in language.

CCSS Introduction



Students who are college and career ready
Students who are looks like in the 21College and Career Ready

  • Read page 6 in your binder.

  • Then work with your Common Core Leadership Team (your school) to create a portrait of the student described as college and career ready on page 6 from the introduction of the Standards. Be sure to illustrate as many aspects of the text as possible!

  • Be creative and make it fun!


Prepare to share
Prepare to Share… looks like in the 21

  • Describe the CCR attributes illustrated on your portrait.

  • How does your CCR portrait compare to the portrait of a student entering your school?

  • If we were to create a portrait of the average high school graduate in Desoto County how would that portrait compare the the CCR portrait? Why?

  • What does CCR really have to do with Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd graders?


  • Describe the CCR attributes illustrated on your portrait. looks like in the 21

  • How does your CCR portrait compare to the portrait of a student entering your school?

  • If we were to create a portrait of the average high school graduate in Desoto County how would that portrait compare the the CCR portrait? Why?

  • What does CCR really have to do with Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd graders?




Two sets of standards
Two Sets of Standards Kindergarten, 1

  • The CCR (College and Career Readiness) Anchor standards

  • Grade-specific standards


Ccr anchor standards
CCR Anchor Standards Kindergarten, 1

  • The CCR Anchor Standards are developed around 4 strands.

  • Reading

  • Writing

  • Speaking and Listening

  • Language


Ccr anchor standards for reading
CCR Anchor Standards for Reading Kindergarten, 1

  • There are 10 Reading Anchor Standards

  • Those 10 standards “anchor” the grade-specific Reading Standards which includes:

    • Reading Standards for Literature- grade-specific standards

    • Reading Standards for Informational Text –grade-specific standards

  • Please turn to the CCSS Standards tab and insert the CCR Anchor Standards for Reading before Reading Standards for Literature.


Ccr anchor standards1
CCR Anchor Standards Kindergarten, 1

  • The CCR anchor standards are constant. They are the same for K-12.

    • The grade-specific standards vary by grade-level. 

  • Each STRAND has a strand specific set.

    • For example, in Reading,

      • Key Ideas and Details

      • Craft and Structure

      • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

      • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity.

    • The Strand Specific Sets remain the same through out the entire strand and the entire document.


Ccr anchor standards for writing
CCR Anchor Standards for Writing Kindergarten, 1

  • There are 10 Writing Anchor Standards

  • Writing- 4 Strand Specific Sets

    • Text Types and Purposes

    • Production and Distribution of Writing

    • Research to Build and Present Knowledge

    • Range of Writing


Writing correction
Writing Correction Kindergarten, 1

  • Please find Reading Standards for Foundational Skills – the Text Types & Purposes set.

    • This is an error. Please mark out the heading Reading Standards for Foundational Skills (RFS) and replace with Writing Standards (W). You will need make the same correction the two pages that follow, as well.

  • Then insert the CCR Anchor Standards for Writing before the pages with your corrected headings.


Ccr anchor standards for speaking and listening
CCR Anchor Standards for Kindergarten, 1Speaking and Listening

  • There are 6 Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening.

  • Speaking and Listening- 2 Strand Specific Sets

    • Comprehension and Collaboration

    • Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas

  • Insert the CCR Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening before the Speaking and Listening Standards.


Ccr anchor standards for language
CCR Anchor Standards for Kindergarten, 1Language

  • There are 6 Anchor Standards for Language

  • Language- 3 Strand Specific Sets

    • Conventions in Standard English

    • Knowledge of Language

    • Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

  • Insert the CCR Anchor Standards for Language behind the Language standards.


Making connections
Making Connections Kindergarten, 1

  • Choose an CCR anchor standard.

    • Example: SL.CCR.2

  • Find the grade-level specific standards to support that CCR anchor standard.

    • Example: SL. K. 2

  • Create a standards stair-step. Show how the standard progresses in detail from K-5, but for 6-12 you may just use a numbered stair step.

  • Where would the most appropriate place for the CCR anchor standard in your illustration?

  • Where would be the most appropriate place for your entering student and your college and career ready student in the visual?

  • When you are finished display all 3 pieces of your art work on the walls around the room to illustrate your understanding of the relationship between the student and the standards.


SO….Are Kindergarten, 1we teaching the CCR Anchor Standards or the grade-specific standards? Why or Why not? How or How not? Justify your answer by referencing your knowledge of the relationship between the two sets of standards?


Getting to know you
Getting to Know You Kindergarten, 1

Common Core State Standards


Reading the standards
Reading the Standards Kindergarten, 1

  • College and Career Readiness Standards

    • Identified by the strand, CCR status, and number

      • Coded: R. CCR. 6

      • Read As: Reading, College and Career Readiness, Standard 6


Reading the standards1
Reading the Standards Kindergarten, 1

  • Grade-Specific Standards

    • Identified by strand, grade, and number (or letter)

    • Coded as: RL.1.1

    • Read as: Reading Literature, Grade 1, Standard 1

    • Coded as: W.2.3

    • Read as Writing, Grade 2, Standard 3


Grade specific ela strands
Grade-Specific ELA Strands Kindergarten, 1

  • Reading Literature -RL

  • Reading Informational Text - RI

  • Reading Foundational Skills - RF

  • Writing -W

  • Speaking and Listening - SL

  • Language – L


One last reminder
One Last Reminder… Kindergarten, 1

Strand. Grade. Standard 


Welcome to the newlywed to the common core standards game
Welcome to the Newlywed Kindergarten, 1(to the Common Core Standards)Game

Where teachers and principals compete to prove who really LOVES the CCSS most! 


You are the next contestant
You are the next contestant… Kindergarten, 1

  • Find the number on the back of your table card.

  • Principals, when your number is called, choose a teacher and come down front.


Question number 1
Question Number 1: Kindergarten, 1

What is the overall goal of the CCSS?

College and Career Readiness


Question number 2
Question Number 2: Kindergarten, 1

Name at least 1 way that the CCSS standards were developed differently from our current standards.


Question number 3
Question Number 3 Kindergarten, 1

Who is responsible for developing the CCSS?

CCSSO & NGACCSS is state led.


Question number 4
Question Number 4 Kindergarten, 1

List the 4 CCR Anchor Standards.

  • Reading

  • Writing

  • Speaking and Listening

  • Language


Question number 5
Question Number 5 Kindergarten, 1

What three things are included in the CCSS standard code? List them in the correct order.

Strand, Grade, Standard 


Question number 6
Question Number 6 Kindergarten, 1

Write the following standard code in word form: RL.2.3

Reading Literature, Second Grade, Standard 3


What does RF represent? Kindergarten, 1

Reading Foundational Skills


Congratulations to our winner
Congratulations to our Winner!! Kindergarten, 1

The Newlywed (to the Common Core Standards)Game


Brain break

Brain Break Kindergarten, 1


What is not covered by the standards
What is NOT covered by the Standards Kindergarten, 1

CCSS Introduction p. 6 & p. 5 in DCS binder


What is not covered by the standards1
What is NOT covered Kindergarten, 1by the Standards

  • “The standards define what all students are expected to know and be able to do, NOT HOW the teachers should teach.”

    • “For example, the use of play with young children is not specified by the Standards, but it is welcome as a valuable activity in its own right and as a way to help students meet the expectations in this document.”


What is not covered by the s tandards
What is NOT covered Kindergarten, 1by the Standards

  • The standards “do NOT describe ALL that can or should be taught.”

    • “The aim of the standards is to articulate fundamentals, not to set out an exhaustive list or a set or restrictions that limit what can be taught beyond what is specified.”


What is not covered by the standards2
What is NOT covered Kindergarten, 1by the Standards

  • The standards “do not define intervention methods or materials to support students who are well below or well above grade-level expectations.”

    • “However, the Standards do provide clear signposts along the way to the goal of college and career readiness for all students.”


What is not covered by the standards3
What is NOT covered Kindergarten, 1by the Standards

  • The standards do not “define the full range of supports appropriate” for ELL or SPED students.

    • “At the the same time all students must have the opportunity to learn and meet the same high standards if they are to access the knowledge and skills necessary in their post-high school lives.”


ELL Kindergarten, 1

  • Each grade will include students who are acquiring English. For those students, it is possible to meet the standards in reading, writing, speaking and listening, without displaying native-like control of conventions and vocabulary.


SPED Kindergarten, 1

  • The standards should be read as allowing for the widest possible range of students to participate fully from the outset and as permitting appropriate accommodations to ensure maximum participation of students with special education needs.

    • For example, for special needs students, reading should allow for the use of Braille, screen-reader technology, or other assistive devices, while writing should include the use of a scribe, computer or speech to text technology. Similarly, speaking and listening should be broadly interpreted to include sign language.


Readiness
Readiness Kindergarten, 1

  • “While the ELA and literacy components described are critical to CCR, they do not define the whole of such readiness.”

    • “Students require a wide-ranging, rigorous academic preparation and particularly in early grades, attention to such matters as social, emotional, and physical development and approached to learning.”



Key design considerations
Key Design Considerations time together today, thus far).

CCSS Introduction p. 4 and p. 2 & 3 in the DCS binder


A focus on results rather than means

A focus on results rather than means

The standards don’t mandate a particular writing process or full-range of metacognitive strategies.


An integrated model of literacy

An integrated model of literacy

Although for conceptual clarity Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language are divided the processes of communication are closely connected.


Research and media skills blended into the standards as a whole

Research and media skills blended into the Standards as a whole

The need to conduct research and to produce and consume media is embedded into every aspect of today’s curriculum.


Shared responsibility for literacy development

Shared Responsibility for Literacy Development

The K-5 standards are applicable to a range of subjects, including but NOT limited to ELA.


Interdisciplinary approach

Interdisciplinary Approach

Extensive research exists in establishing the need for CCR students to be proficient in reading complex informational text independently in a variety of content areas.



Brain break1

Brain Break implementation of the standards.


Reading strand
Reading Strand implementation of the standards.


Text complexity and the growth of comprehension

Text Complexity and the growth of comprehension

Standard 10 defines a grade-by-grade “staircase” of increasing text complexity that rises from beginning reading to CCR level.


Text complexity and growth of comprehension
Text Complexity and Growth of Comprehension implementation of the standards.

Students must:

  • Have a steady growing ability to discern more from and make fuller use of text.

  • Make an increasing number of connections among ideas and text.

  • Consider a wide-range of contextual evidence.

  • Become more sensitive to inconsistences, ambiguities, and poor reasoning in text.


Why text complexity matters
Why Text Complexity Matters implementation of the standards.

  • CCR depends of on students’ abilities to answer questions associated with complex text.


Why text complexity matters1
Why Text Complexity Matters implementation of the standards.

  • Declining Complexity of Texts *

  • Lack of Reading of Complex Texts Independently *

  • Too Many Students are Reading at Too Low a Level*

    • Lack of Reading*


The standards approach to text complexity
The Standards Approach to Text Complexity implementation of the standards.

A Three-Part Model for Text Complexity


A three part model for measuring text complexity
A Three-Part Model for Measuring Text Complexity implementation of the standards.

  • Qualitative

    • Refers to meaning or purpose, structure, language conventions, clarity, and knowledge demands

    • best measured or only measurable by an attentive human reader.

  • Quantitative

    • Refers to word length or frequency, sentence length, and text cohesion

    • Typically measured by computer software

  • Reader and Task Considerations

    • Refers to variables specific to particular readers (motivation, knowledge, and experience) and particular tasks (purpose of task and questions posed)

    • Best made by teachers employing their professional judgment, experience, and knowledge.


A three part model for measuring text complexity1
A Three-Part Model for Measuring Text Complexity implementation of the standards.

Qualitative- Human Reader

Quantitative- Software

Reader and Task- Human Factor/Teacher


Key considerations in implementing text complexity
Key Considerations in Implementing Text Complexity implementation of the standards.

  • The tools for measuring text complexity are at once useful and imperfect.

  • The standards recommend that multiple quantitative measures be used and confirmed or overruled by a qualitative analysis of the text in question.

    • Use AR and Lexiles, and any other measures

    • Human reader (teacher judgment) trumps all


Key considerations in implementing text complexity1
Key Considerations in Implementing Text Complexity implementation of the standards.

  • Current Quantitative (software) measures (Lexiles) are less valid for certain types of text.

    • Text for early readers

    • Poetry

  • Many current Quantitative (software) measures underestimate the challenge of complex fiction text.

    • Example: Grapes of Wrath (See Example 2 on page 13.)

    • Flesch-Kincaid and Lexile rate this piece appropriate for 2 and 3 grade, because of familiar words like grape and simple syntax.


Key considerations in implementing text complexity2
Key Considerations in Implementing Text Complexity implementation of the standards.

  • Measure must be aligned to CCR expectations for all students.

    • The end-point of the scale should be CCR.

    • MetaMetrics has realigned Lexile ranges to match the Standards text complexity grade-bands and upped its trajectory through the grades.

      • See Figure 3.


Key considerations in implementing text complexity3
Key Considerations in Implementing Text Complexity implementation of the standards.

  • Students’ ability to read complex text does not always develop in a linear fashion.

    • See Appendix A page 9

  • Students reading well above and well below the grade-band need additional support.

  • Many students on course for CCR are likely to need scaffolding as they master higher levels of text complexity.

    • The goal being to decrease scaffolding by increasing independence.


Text exemplars
Text Exemplars implementation of the standards.

  • They are samples primarily serve to exemplify the level of text complexity and quality that the Standards require in a given grade band.

  • They should serve as guideposts in helping you select text of similar complexity, quality, and range for your classroom.

  • They do NOT represent a partial or complete reading list.

  • Appropriate complexity requires students to work with whole texts rather than passages.


Text exemplars1
Text Exemplars implementation of the standards.

  • The exemplars are divided into text complexity bands

    • K-1, 2-3, 4-5, 6-8, 9-10, 11-CCR

  • They are separated into stories, poetry, informational texts (as well as read-aloud text in K-3).


Selecting text exemplars
Selecting Text Exemplars implementation of the standards.

  • Complexity

    • Three-part model

  • Quality

    • Only texts of recognized value

    • Classic or historically significant texts

    • Contemporary works of comparable literary merit, cultural significance, and rich content.

  • Range

    • Sufficiently complex, high quality text

    • Publication date, authorship, and subject matter


Sample performance tasks
Sample Performance Tasks implementation of the standards.

  • The Text Exemplars are supplemented by brief performance tasks that further clarify the meaning of the Standards.

  • They illustrate specifically the application of the Standards to text of sufficient complexity, quality, and range.

  • Relevant Reading standards are noted in brackets following each task, and the words in italics reflect the wording of the standard itself.


Based on what you know about text complexity and the text exemplars what conclusions have you drawn?


Reading grade specific standards
Reading Grade-Specific Standards exemplars what conclusions have you drawn?

  • Remember, the standards are written as end-of-the year expectations.

  • Text complexity has a huge impact on the interpretation of the standards.

  • There are standards for literature and informational text.


Reading literature standards

  • Independently read through the Reading Standards for Literature and make any notes about what jumps out at you in the Standards.

  • Then discuss your findings with your team.

  • Using the post-it notes, add at least 2 things that you discussed to our RL anchor chart.

Reading Literature Standards

Reading Literature Standards


Let s look at a standard
Let’s look at a Standard Literature and make any notes about what jumps out at you in the Standards.

  • RL.1.6

  • Identify who is telling a story at various points in a text.

  • Some standards are NEW. You will be required to teach things that you haven’t taught.

  • First Grade Common Core Video


Reading informational standards

  • Independently read through the Reading Standards for Informational Text and make any notes about what jumps out at you in the Standards.

  • Then discuss your findings with your team.

  • Using the post-it notes, add at least 2 things that you discussed to our RI anchor chart.

Reading Informational Standards

Standards for Reading Informational Text


Let s look at a standard1
Let’s look at a Standard Informational Text and make any notes about what jumps out at you in the Standards.

  • RI.K.3

  • Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

  • Some standards appear to closely resemble our current standards, but the text complexity has a huge impact on the expectation.

  • Play Kindergarten Video


Writing strand
Writing Strand Informational Text and make any notes about what jumps out at you in the Standards.


Writing text types

Writing: Text Types


Responding to reading

Responding to Reading

Writing, Standard 9


Research

Research

Writing is central to inquiry.


Definition of the text types
Definition of the Text Types strand, though skills important to research are infused throughout the Standards.

  • Arguments are used for many purposes—

  • to change the reader’s point of view

  • to bring about some action on the reader’s part

  • to ask the reader to accept the writer’s explanation or evaluation of a concept, issue, or problem.

  • An argument is a reasoned, logical way of demonstrating that the writer’s position, belief, or conclusion is valid.


Opinion in k 5
“Opinion” in K-5 strand, though skills important to research are infused throughout the Standards.

  • Although young children are not able to produce fully developed logical arguments, they develop a variety of methods to extend and elaborate their work by:

    • providing examples,

    • offering reasons for their assertions,

    • explaining cause and effect.

    • These kinds of expository structures are steps on the road to argument.

  • In grades K–5, the term “opinion” is used to refer to this developing form of argument.


Informational expository
Informational/Expository strand, though skills important to research are infused throughout the Standards.

  • Informational/explanatory writing conveys information accurately.

  • This kind of writing serves one or more closely related purposes:

    • Increase readers’ knowledge of a subject

    • Help readers better understand a procedure or process

    • Provide readers with an enhanced comprehension of a concept.


Informational expository1
Informational/Expository strand, though skills important to research are infused throughout the Standards.

  • Informational/explanatory writing addresses matters such as:

    • Types -What are the different types of poetry?

    • Components -What are the parts of a motor?

    • Size - How big is the United States?

    • Function - What is an X-ray used for?

    • Behavior - How does the legislative branch of government function?

    • Why things happen -Why do some authors blend genres?


Arguments explanations
Arguments & Explanations strand, though skills important to research are infused throughout the Standards.

  • Although information is provided in both arguments and explanations, the two types of writing have different aims.

  • Arguments seek to make people believe that something is true or to persuade people to change their beliefs or behavior.

  • Explanations, on the other hand, start with the assumption of truthfulness and answer questions about why or how. Their aim is to make the reader understand rather than to persuade him or her to accept a certain point of view.

  • In short, arguments are used for persuasion and explanations for clarification.


Narrative writing
Narrative Writing strand, though skills important to research are infused throughout the Standards.

  • Narrative writing conveys experience

    • either real or imaginary

    • uses time as its deep structure.

  • It can be used for many purposes

    • to inform, instruct, persuade, or entertain.


Texts that blend types
Texts that Blend Types strand, though skills important to research are infused throughout the Standards.

  • Skilled writers many times use a blend of these three text types to accomplish their purposes.

  • For example, The Longitude Prize, included above and in Appendix B, embeds narrative elements within a largely expository structure.


Writing samples
Writing Samples strand, though skills important to research are infused throughout the Standards.

  • The writing samples are annotated to illustrate the criteria required to the the CCSS for particular types of writing –argument, informative/explanatory, and narrative- in a given grade.

  • Each sample exhibits at least the level of quality required to meet the writing standard for that grade.


Writing samples1
Writing Samples strand, though skills important to research are infused throughout the Standards.

  • At the lower grades, giving reasons for opinions and preferences is required by the Standards in opinion writing.


Writing standards

WritingStandards

Standards for Writing



Speaking and listening strand
Speaking and Listening Strand the Writing standards.


Listen speaking and listening is vital
Listen… the Writing standards. Speaking and Listening is Vital

  • If literacy levels are to improve, the aims of the English language arts classroom, especially in the earliest grades, must include oral language in a purposeful, systematic way, in part because it helps students master the printed word.


Speaking and listening

Speaking and Listening

Including but not limited to skills necessary for formal presentations


Flexible communication and collaboration

Students must express and listen carefully to ideas, integrate information from oral, visual, and media sources, evaluate what they hear use visual displays to strategically achieve communication purposes by adapting speech to context and task.

Flexible Communication and Collaboration

Students must learn how to work together.


Oral language written language
Oral Language & integrate information from oral, visual, and media sources, evaluate what they hear use visual displays to strategically achieve communication purposes by adapting speech to context and task. Written Language

  • See Appendix A, page 26, Figure 14

  • For children in preschool and the early grades, receptive and expressive abilities do not develop simultaneously or at the same pace:

    • Receptive language generally precedes expressive language. Children need to be able to understand words before they can produce and use them.


Speaking and listening1
Speaking and Listening integrate information from oral, visual, and media sources, evaluate what they hear use visual displays to strategically achieve communication purposes by adapting speech to context and task.

  • The preschoolers who had heard more words, and subsequently had learned more words orally, were better readers.

  • In short, early language advantage persists and manifests itself in higher levels of literacy.

  • See Appendix A, page 26, Figure 15


The research strongly suggests that the English language arts classroom should explicitly address the link between oral and written language, exploiting the influence of oral language on a child’s later ability to read by allocating instructional time to building children’s listening skills, as called for in the Standards.


  • This arts classroom should explicitly address the link between oral and written language, exploiting the influence of oral language on a child’s later ability to read by allocating focus on oral language is of greatest importance for the children most at risk—children for whom English is a second language and children who have not been exposed at home to the kind of language found in written texts (Dickinson & Smith, 1994).

  • Ensuring that all children in the United States have access to an excellent education re- quires that issues of oral language come to the fore in elementary classrooms.


The read aloud link
The Read-Aloud Link arts classroom should explicitly address the link between oral and written language, exploiting the influence of oral language on a child’s later ability to read by allocating

  • Children in the early grades—particularly kindergarten through grade 3—benefit from participating in rich, structured conversations with an adult in response to written texts that are read aloud, orally comparing and contrasting as well as analyzing and synthesizing.

  • The Standards acknowledge the importance of this aural dimension of early learning by including K–3 Speaking and Listening standards and Appendix B- an extensive number of read-aloud text exemplars appropriate for K–1 and for grades 2–3.


  • Because, c arts classroom should explicitly address the link between oral and written language, exploiting the influence of oral language on a child’s later ability to read by allocating hildren’s listening comprehension likely outpaces reading comprehension until the middle school years, it is particularly important that students in the earliest grades build knowledge through being read to as well as through reading, with the balance gradually shifting to reading independently.

  • Most titles selected for kindergarten and grade 1 will need to be read aloud exclusively, some titles selected for grades 2–5 may be appropriate for read-alouds as well as for reading independently.


  • By reading a story or nonfiction selection aloud, teachers allow children to experience written language without the burden of decoding, granting them access to content that they may not be able to read and understand by themselves.

    • Children are then free to focus their mental energy on the words and ideas presented in the text, and they will eventually be better prepared to tackle rich written content on their own.


Let s look at a standard2
Let’s Look at a Standard allow children to experience written language without the burden of decoding, granting them access to content that they may not be able to read and understand by themselves.

  • Second Grade Speaking and Listening Video


Speaking and listening standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Standards for Speaking and Listening



Language strand
Language Strand standards and or the standards.


Language

Language

Elements of Language Standards


Language1
Language knowledge of language, and vocabulary.

  • The inclusion of Language standards in their own strand should not be taken as an indication that skills related to conventions, knowledge of language, and vocabulary are unimportant to reading, writing, speaking, and listening; indeed, they are inseparable from such contexts.


Development of grammatical knowledge
Development of Grammatical Knowledge knowledge of language, and vocabulary.

  • Grammar and usage development in children and in adults rarely follows a linear path.


Language2

The Language standards include the essential “rules” of standard written and spoken English, but they approach language as a matter of craft and informed choice among alternatives.

Language

Conventions


Vocabulary

The vocabulary standards focus on understanding words and phrases, their relationships, and their nuances and on acquiring new vocabulary, particularly general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

Vocabulary

Vocabulary is included in the Language strand.



Three tiers of words
Three Tiers of Words and being read to but also through direct vocabulary instruction (particularly in the earliest grades) through purposeful classroom discussions around rich content.

  • Tier One Words

    • Words used in everyday speech.

  • Tier Two Words-

    • The standards refer to as general academic words.

    • They are far more likely to appear in written text than in speech.

    • They appear in all sorts of texts.

    • They represent subtle or precise ways to say simple things.

  • Tier Three Words-

    • The standards refer to as domain-specific words

    • They are key for understanding a new concept.

    • More common in informational text than in literature.

    • Recognized as new or “hard” words for most readers.


Language standards

Language Standards

Standards for Language



Common core leadership team

Discuss your school’s plan for sharing today’s information with the rest of your staff.

Prepare to share your implementation plan with the group.

Common Core Leadership Team


3 2 1
3,2,1 information with the rest of your staff.

  • 3things that you’ve learned.

  • 2 questions that you still have.

  • 1 thing that was beneficial to you today.


Common core the what2

Common Core - “The What” information with the rest of your staff.

Desoto County Schools

K-2 Symposium Day One June 6, 2011


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