A model for reading digital facial tones and body language in the online classroom
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A Model for Reading Digital Facial Tones and Body Language in the Online Classroom. Leslie J. King, Ph.D. Franklin University Columbus, Ohio [email protected] Human Interaction.

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A model for reading digital facial tones and body language in the online classroom

A Model for Reading Digital Facial Tones and Body Language in the Online Classroom

Leslie J. King, Ph.D.

Franklin University

Columbus, Ohio

[email protected]


Human interaction
Human Interaction in the Online Classroom

  • Verbal and non-verbal communication can be uniquely separate, but in most situations they both need to be present to understand the full meaning of the communication (Arndt and Janney, 1987)


Words
Words in the Online Classroom

  • All non-verbal communication is that which does not use words (Andersen, 1999)

  • “The telltale body is all tongues.” (Ralph Waldo Emerson)


Educational goal of communicating
Educational Goal of Communicating in the Online Classroom

  • For there to be verbal and non-verbal communication between students and faculty:

    • Students and faculty

    • Students and students

  • To what end:

    • In order for faculty to observe and determine student comprehension of the course material.

      • Satisfactory comprehension --- move on

      • Unsatisfactory comprehension – intervention strategy


Criticism
Criticism in the Online Classroom

  • In the distance learning classroom, non-verbal communication is not present, therefore online faculty do not have the same ability as F2F instructors to determine a student’s learning comprehension.


Non verbal
Non-verbal in the Online Classroom

Traditional

  • Facial Expressions

  • Eye Contact

  • Body Language

    • Posture

    • Gestures

Evolving

  • Attendance (tardiness or absence)

  • Late submissions


Information gathered
Information Gathered in the Online Classroom

  • Non-verbal clues can indicate that there are potential barriers in the learning process:

    • Confusion

    • Frustration

    • Lack of engagement

    • Agreement

    • Understanding

  • Are potential barriers actually opportunities for interactions.


Potential causes
Potential Causes in the Online Classroom

  • How the material is presented

  • How the course is designed

  • Personal circumstances

  • Even when everything is ideal


Myth in the Online Classroom

(D) Feedback Loop


Non verbal clues feedback loop
Non-Verbal Clues Feedback Loop in the Online Classroom

(E) Non-verbal Clues Feedback Loop

(D) Feedback Loop


Online non verbals
Online Non- in the Online ClassroomVerbals’

(E) Non-verbal Clues Feedback Loop

  • Frequencies of course log-ins

  • Navigation behavior

  • Late assignment submissions

  • Last minute submissions of assignments

  • Discussion board post quality

  • Low scores on assignments

  • Slow responses to emails

  • Types of questions students ask

(D) Feedback Loop


Observation strategies
Observation Strategies in the Online Classroom

  • Develop practice assessments or exercises that can provide information on student performance.

  • Insert “Reflective Learning” components which focus on a student sharing their learning experience.

  • Online instructors can build into their teaching routine the observation of student log-in patterns and navigation behavior.

  • Don’t just look at a student’s assignment scores independently;

  • Similar to making eye contact with a student, email students directly about their performance, log-in frequency, discussion board activity and assignment grades.

  • Solicit feedback from students as to how things are going, the good and bad…


Key in the Online Classroom

  • Feedback needs to be timely

    • Look for non-verbal clues during the lesson

  • Intervention strategies

    • Student specific and personal

    • May apply to the whole class

  • Remain flexible and adaptable to “change” during the learning process

  • Needs to be consistent


Helpful hints
Helpful Hints in the Online Classroom

  • Plan ahead to observe non-verbal clues

  • Change instructional behavior

  • Develop your classroom management around the non-verbal feedback loop

  • Document what you observe and plan for improvements when the class is over


Observe and intervene

(E) Non-verbal Clues Feedback Loop in the Online Classroom

Observe and Intervene

(D) Feedback Loop

Non-verbal Observation

Intervention Strategy


References
References in the Online Classroom

  • Andersen, P.A. (1999). Nonverbal communication: Forms and functions. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield Publishing Co.

  • Arndt, H., & Janney, R.W. (1987). InterGrammar: Toward an integrative model of verbal, prosodic and kinesicchoices in speech. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.


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